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How to Make Your E-bike Go Further (E2)

Continued from the previous article The Secret of Ultra-Long Life Span – How to Make Your E-Bike Go Further (E1)

Many people wonder how far they can ride an electric-assist bike, but businesses are often unable to provide an accurate answer because there are so many variables. So, how can you ride further under the given configuration conditions? Here is a list of general tips for your reference, following the previous article on The Secret of Ultra-Long Life Span – How to Make Your E-bike Go Further (E1).

  1. Tires

Lightweight tires may appear appealing and logical, but they should not be chosen. This is a “false economy” product that will negatively impact your ride. Because of the extra weight, you will use the sidewall more on an electric bike, and because the rear wheel is difficult to get off the ground, it will take more force when hitting rocks and roots.

Higher tire pressure and heavy-duty tires are required to avoid frequent sidewall punctures. While weight is one of the influencing factors for range longevity, durability and size must also be considered.

  1. Brakes

Don’t skimp on efficient brakes, just like you wouldn’t on tires. Upgrade to four-piston brakes if possible. You’ll improve your power by braking less frequently and only when necessary. And a thousand reminders to check your brake pads for wear frequently before, during, and after a ride, and to always keep spare pads on hand.

  1. Chains and Guide Pulleys

A clean, well-lubricated, and free-rolling chain experiences far less resistance than a dirty, poorly maintained chain. And, especially when shifting uphill, the motor can put a lot of strain on the drive train. So, as detailed in the How to Maintain Your Electric Bike article on how to clean your chain, check for wear and tear regularly and keep it well lubricated.

  1. Turning

Leaning your e-bike into a turn requires more muscle power, but once your balance and center of gravity are correct, the weight of the bike will maintain consistent traction. To get a longer ride, avoid bouncing between turns and instead take a more cautious approach. Try pedaling around corners while keeping the motor running on slight uphill or flat gentle turns. If you think you’re going too fast, slow down but keep the cranks turning. We discovered that this continuous and calmer motion consumes less energy than braking and then skidding.

  1. Climbing a hill

Remember to shift into neutral before pressing the power button. Again, high cadence is essential. Find a comfortable seat that allows you to keep your weight on the rear wheel. An e-front bike’s wheel is less likely to lift, allowing you to sit up straighter and concentrate on traction. Shift down through the flywheel to keep the motor running at a high cadence. Keep your gaze on the horizon; don’t be concerned about a slick course; instead, concentrate on maintaining power.

  1. Downhill

Don’t forget to set the downhill mode to “energy saving.” Even if you believe it makes no difference because you won’t be pedaling much at this time. But it works, and over the course of a 30-40km ride, it all adds up. Don’t think about accelerating sharply once the speed exceeds the speed limiter (25kph/15.5mph). Instead, keep a steady cadence and maintain your impulse in the turns. Rather than pedaling, accelerate, as the bike will not accelerate without this assistance. Don’t be concerned about roots and rocks; you won’t be able to jump up like a normal bike, and you’ll take them out anyway. Consider going bigger and wider!

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